Our division FrontMet Biofuel is specialized in innovative products and engineering services for the biofuel energy sector.
The time to tackle climate change is now and biomass has an important role to play. Transition towards renewable resources will have a big impact on the global CO2 emissions.

 

Biomass conversion

Thermochemical conversion of biomass is considered as a key technology for greening fossil-based energy and chemistry systems. Biomass is converted to a commodity (either solid, fluid or gaseous) that can be used for a wide variety of energy and chemical applications. Biomass can be converted to green syngas or bio oil. Additionally, this process yields bio coal as a residual product from pyrolysis. Depending on the quality bio coal can be used a soil improver, activated carbon, or as replacement of fossil coals in industrial applications. Gasification yields a green syngas and can use either homogeneous biomass or bio coal als feedstock. The syngas can be used as feedstock for chemical industries or can be fed into a CHP for production of electricity and heat. For most applications the syngas contains too little hydrogen for a complete conversion of the biomass carbon. Adding hydrogen though Power to gas increases the process efficiency.

Wood chips

We supply chips produced from logging residues, sawmill and wood processing residues as well as by chipping of low value timber. Wood chips are used for heating and for generating electric power; they belong to the important woody biomass group.

Specifications:

  • Main pieces pine with admixture of birch, aspen, alder;
  • Fraction length 5 – 50 mm, thickness up to 30 mm;
  • Ash content up to 3%;
  • Moisture content 25% – 40%;
  • Heating value not less that 10200 kJ/kg;
  • Radioactivity not more than 300 Bg/kg.

We ensure in line with FSC certification that the production of wood chips is sustainable.

Pellets

Industrial wood pellets are burned in power plants for electricity production. they can be also used in combined power and heating plants and even on smaler heating plants. Industrial standard wood peets are energy dense, low in moisture, and uniformly-sized. These pellets are used in many scenarios, including Biomass dedicated energy plants, co-firing, combined heat and power plants, and industrial scale public and private heating. Their high energy content, density, and uniform size combine to produce an efficient, easy to transport, and reliable form of low carbon combustion.

Bio Carbon products

Torrefaction is the first step in the biomass conversion and application process, a mild thermal treatment of biomass or raw materials containing biomass under low-oxygen conditions.
The resulting bio coal can be used directly in traditional coal fired power plants or serve as a feedstock for further biomass processing and significantly reduces fossil CO2 emissions.
Compared to coal, torrefied pellets/brikets can reduce the greenhouse gas emissions by 90% per GWh.
Biomass combustion also reduces nitrogen oxides (NOX) emissions by 50% to 70% and sulphur dioxides (SO2) emissions by 90%, while generating no toxic mercury emissions. Bio coal pellets/brikets have superior energy density, reducing supply chain and logistics costs by 25% to 30% compared to conventional wood pellets. Bio coal pellets are produced from certified forests, green residue, and can be easily transported anywhere in the world by sea, rail and trucks.
Compared to coal, torrefied pellets/brikets can reduce the greenhouse gas emissions by 90% per GWh.
Biomass combustion also reduces nitrogen oxides (NOX) emissions by 50% to 70% and sulphur dioxides (SO2) emissions by 90%, while generating no toxic mercury emissions.

Char

Biochar is a charcoal like substance which is produced by heating organic “feedstocks” to temperatures in excess of 350°C in an oxygen free environment. This process is called pyrolysis. Biochar differs from charcoal in that it can be produced from a wide range of feedstocks including crop residues, manure and biosolids, as well as wood, which is the usual feedstock for charcoal production.

It also differs from charcoal in its means of utilisation; biochar is produced with the specific aim of application to soil, while charcoal is mainly used as a source of fuel.

Application of biochar to the soil has been shown to increase soil fertility and to decrease greenhouse gas emissions from the soil while also sequestering carbon.